Cryopreservation of human and animal cells and tissues is a widespread practice in life science research and often requires the use of liquid nitrogen to achieve a storage temperature that is sufficiently low (-200°C). Current estimates for the research market indicate the demand for cryopreservation media at $25M in the U.S. and between $70M and $100M globally, growing at a 15% CAGR. Despite attractive growth prospects, cryopreservation methods have some limitations:

 

  • Some cells and tissues cannot be cryopreserved (e.g. primary neurons, white blood cells, cornea)
  • Various cell types may lose viability during the freeze-thaw process
  • Preservation formulae often contain human or animal products -- a key concern for FDA approval
  • Liquid nitrogen systems are expensive, require maintenance, and demand the highest safety protocols

Fresh

Primary Neurons

Traditional

Cryopreservation of
Primary Neurons

C80EZ®

Cryopreservation of
Primary Neurons

 

Being able to provide novel solutions to cryopreservation challenges is a core mission of CryoCrate, especially as life science and clinical markets (a) move into regenerative therapies and (b) seek to minimize costs. CryoCrate's technology will enable researchers to expand the number of cell types that can be cryopreserved and potentially eliminate the need for liquid nitrogen storage.

Review efficacy of C80EZ® post-thaw plating, motility, and viability as it pertains to the research market:

Research